Tag Archives: wine buying

The buying wine on-line checklist

buying wine on-lineHow to find value when you buy wine on-line

This is the first of two parts looking at how the coronavirus pandemic has changed the way we buy wine. Today, part I: finding value when buying wine on-line. Friday, part II: Will the pandemic lead to changes so it’s easier to buy wine on-line?

More of us are buying wine on-line than ever before – Nielsen says e-commerce alcohol sales increased an unimaginable 291 percent in the 52 weeks ending in March. And direct sales from wineries were up by 40 percent over the same period.

But how do we know that we’re getting value when we buy wine on-line? Never fear; that’s why the Wine Curmudgeon is here. I’ve spent the past month buying wine on-line to see whether it’s a practical alternative during the duration. The answer, not surprisingly, is that it all depends, and it’s not necessarily about how much the wine costs.

Know, too that not all on-line wine retailing is the same. Buying wine directly from the winery has almost nothing in common with buying wine from a retailer — limited selection and different laws among them. In addition, your neighborhood wine shop is likely to offer better value than a chain retailer, if only because they’ve seen you in the store and don’t want to tick you off. To most chains, you’re nothing more than a digital account floating in the cyber-ether.

Keep these five points in mind when buying wine on-line:

• Vintage. Some retailers list the vintages for the wines; some don’t. If they don’t, there’s no guarantee you’ll get the current vintage. A Total Wine in Dallas sent me the 2016 vintage of a white wine; the current vintage is 2018. The 2016, not surprisingly, let much to be desired.

• Substitutions. Make sure you don’t allow the retailer to substitute its choice if what you want is out of stock. I was offered a California red for my Spanish tempranillo, which are hardly the same thing. Yes, the retailer is supposed to tell you about the substitution when they make it, but this doesn’t mean it always happens.

• Selection. Some retailers, like Spec’s in Dallas, only offer part of their inventory on-line. The Spec’s near me has one of the best wine assortments in the U.S.; on-line, though, it’s mostly supermarket plonk.

• Retailers vs. delivery services. Companies like Drizly and Instacart are delivery services that contract with retailers. This means limited selection and almost always higher prices. It should say on the website if a third-party delivers for the retailer.

• Shipping and delivery. Two things have traditionally slowed on-line wine sales – restrictive laws and the high cost of shipping and delivery. Sometimes, I think the latter is the bigger stumbling block. I bought 17 bottles from wine.com in March, and the shipping charge worked out to almost $3 a bottle. My order from Total Wine cost me $10 for delivery plus a 15 percent tip, again adding about $3 a bottle to the total. Is the convenience worth the extra money? Only you can decide that.

Image courtesy of The Healthy Voyager, using a Creative Commons license

More about wine buying and value:
The cheap wine checklist
How to find a good wine retailer
Follow-up: Just because it’s a cheap wine doesn’t mean it’s worth drinking

wine retailer foolishness

Once more, how consumers buy wine

how we buy wine
Even I know — and I’m just a gratuitous cute dog so people will put this on Facebook — how consumers buy wine.

Dear Wine Business:

I know we have our differences, but we do want the same thing — to get more people to drink wine. Hence another of my letters, which I send you periodically to tell you what happens when I talk to consumers about wine. This time, how they buy wine, and it doesn’t have much to do with scores or premiumized wine.

Marlowe, one of the two official dogs of the Wine Curmudgeon, needed a haircut, so I took him to a local place, Kinder Kritter. I know the owner a little, but we’ve never talked about wine. This time, though, she was curious about my license plate, 10 WINE. I told her, and she asked me for some recommendations. What do you drink now? I asked.

I know you don’t want to believe this, Wine Business, but she drinks $10 Bogle cabernet sauvignon, and $12 J. Lohr cabernet when she wants to splurge. So cheap, Big Wine grocery store brands that are easy to find and aren’t sold on the basis of reviews, winespeak, or cute labels. In other words, none of the stuff she is supposed to drink and which makes her a fairly typical wine drinker.

Yes, small sample size, but it’s not like I haven’t heard it before. She likes red wine that is easy to drink, but has a little more going on than just that. I recommended the McManis cabernet and the Rene Barbier Spanish red blend. The former was similar to what she was already drinking, and the latter was like it in some ways, but also different enough so that she could expand her horizons. Because isn’t that what every wine drinker should do?

The owner was also very excited when I told her the Barbier was only $6. So much for premiumization, huh?

I’ll let you know what she thinks of my recommendations. And thanks again for your patience in reading this.

Your pal,
The Wine Curmudgeon

More about consumer wine buying habits:
How people really buy wine
Another study agrees: We buy wine on price
What drives wine drinkers? Price, of course

The ultimate do-it-yourself wine review

Tired of the Winestream Media and tasting notes that make no sense at all? Tired of the Wine Curmudgeon whining about the Winestream Media and its heavy handed ways?

Then write your own wine review. It ?s fun and easy ? just click on the drop-down menus and you ?re set. Those of you who get the blog via email or on Facebook may have to go the website — just click here to do so.

I bought this wine at the

I wasn’t sure what to buy, so I bought

and

The wine tasted like

I’m not sure if I liked the wine, because

Still, I guess I’m supposed to give the wine a score, so it gets

A tip o’ the Wine Curmudgeon’s fedora to Al Yellon at the baseball blog Bleed Cubbie Blue, who gave me the idea for this and has to write about the Cubs every day. He has my sympathy.