Tag Archives: La Moneda Reserva malbec

Wine of the week: La Moneda Reserva Malbec 2015

La Moneda malbec

The last bottle of La Moneda malbec at this Dallas-area Walmart.

The La Moneda malbec delivers $7 worth of quality, but it’s not worth driving an hour back and forth in Black Friday weekend traffic

There are two things to know about the Chilean La Moneda malbec, the “world’s greatest cheap wine.” First, many people who buy it won’t like it – it’s missing the sweet fruit they’ve come to expect from wine at this price. Barefoot it ain’t. Second, it’s a nice enough wine, but probably not worth the trouble I went to to buy it, which included an hour drive to Walmart and back during Dallas’ Black Friday weekend.

Having said that, the La Moneda malbec ($7, purchased, 13.5%) offers value for its price – and it’s important to note it’s only available at some Walmarts. Look for an enticing blueberry aroma and a straightforward, if simple, approach. It’s more tart than an Argentine malbec, but there is pleasant black fruit. On the other hand, the finish is a touch thin and could probably use some sort of oak to balance the tartness. But I enjoyed the wine, and it’s easily wine of the week quality, though not quite worthy of the $10 Hall of Fame.

The La Moneda malbec doesn’t have the cloying, heavy dark fruit that so many cheap wines have and that many people who buy it will expect. Its absence, though, probably explains why the wine won the best varietal red for less than £15 (about US$20) award at the Decanter competition.

I’ve judged similar competitions, where the wines are judged by price, and most of the cheap reds taste the same regardless of varietal – waterfalls of sweet fruit gushing into your mouth, coating your tongue, and leaving you gasping for water. So when a wine doesn’t do that, like the La Moneda malbec, it’s time to reach for the superlatives. Call it winning by contrast – the more tart the wine, the better medal you’re going to give it.

La Moneda Reserva malbec – the best cheap wine in the world?

La Moneda reserva malbecIs Chile’s La Moneda Reserva malbec really the best cheap wine in the world? Probably not. But it is a wonderful example of how screwed up wine is.

May 15, 2017 update: A reader writes: Why so much publicity and so little availability?

Nov. 27 update: The Wine Curmudgeon braved Black Friday Dallas traffic to drive to a Walmart in Irving and bought the last bottle in the store. The review is here.

Nov. 22 update: The wine is coming to Dallas, and the Wine Curmudgeon is on the hunt for it. Which, of course, doesn’t mean I will be able to find it, wine availability being what it is.

Nov. 16 update: The cyber-ether is agog this morning with news that the La Moneda will be available in the U.S., apparently next week, at select Walmarts. I will try to find a bottle for review, though none of the “breathless, buy this wine now” stories said if it was the same wine that is the focus of this blog post and won the award.

Where else but wine would a product that no one can buy in the U.S. make headlines throughout the country? “Walmart’s $6 red wine named one of the best in the world,” screamed Fox News. “Wal-Mart brand red wine named one of the best in the world,” shouted CNBC. And, my favorite, from the ultra-hip Daily Meal, “Walmart Brand Red Wine Costing $6 Named One of the Best in the World,” complete with diaper reference.

That’s because the wine business teaches us that only expensive wine is any good, and the U.S. media parrots that line whenever possible. No one in this country can buy the La Moneda Reserva malbec, because it’s a private label sold only at ASDA, a supermarket chain owned by Walmart in Great Britain. But who cares? It’s cheap! Really cheap!!

Can you imagine those news outlets doing the same thing for ketchup or blue jeans or a car that none of their readers could buy? Of course not. But it’s wine! That’s cheap!! Really cheap!!!

To their credit, my colleagues in the Winestream Media didn’t go quite as berserk when the La Moneda Reserva malbec won a platinum medal at Decanter’s World Wine Awards. Some noted that it’s odd that a Chilean wine made with malbec, an Argentine grape, did so well. Some made the point that much of the fuss was silly since no one could buy it. And none made any claims to quality, since none had tasted it.

I haven’t either. But since I’ve probably tasted more grocery store wine that anyone else in the world, I’d guess that the La Moneda Reserva malbec is likely well made and deserving of its medal. I’m a little concerned that one of the judges called it “a crowd pleaser,” which is wine judge for lots of fruit. But is it appreciably better than any other wine in the $10 Hall of Fame? What do you think?

Know, too, that this is almost certainly a one-off success, given the way private label works. The company that found the wine for ASDA, International Procurement & Logistics, supplies products based on pricing, not necessarily quality. ASDA wanted a red wine to sell at retail for £5.75 that it could make a certain margin on, and that’s what International Procurement looked for. It wasn’t about terroir, but the cost of grapes, and the quality was a happy accident.

So be glad that British wine drinkers have a quality $10 wine to drown their Brexit sorrows with. But also wish the media in this country that went silly about a cheap wine being good would pay more attention to what’s on the shelves at their grocery stores. Maybe then we’d have better wine to buy in this country.