Tag Archives: Fourth of July wine

Fourth of July wine 2017

Fourth of July wine 2015

Fourth of July wineWhat do many of us do when we celebrate a birthday? Drink wine, of course, whether it’s for a toast or for a birthday dinner. So why not do the same thing when the United States celebrates its birthday?

Best yet, the Fourth of July is a terrific porch wine holiday, a concept that doesn’t get enough attention in our rush to drink as much heavy, over-oaked, and too much alcohol wine because our wine betters tell us we’re supposed to.

So consider these wines as a starting point for your July 4 celebration (and all with a July 4 connection):

Listel Grain de Gris Rose 2014 ($12, purchased, 12.5%): This very pale rose, from Camargue in Van Gogh country in the south of France, is unlike almost any French rose I’ve ever had. There’s freshness and lots of soft strawberry fruit, but it’s not crisp or tart. Having said that, it’s still fun to drink, and the bottle is gone before you realize it. And, of course, we wouldn’t have won the Revolutionary War without French money, troops, and ships.

Mumm Napa Brut Prestige NV ($20, purchased, 12.5%): Tried and true California sparkler with firm bubbles and apple and citrus fruit — and is widely available. Price isn’t bad, either, given how ridiculous most Champagne prices are.

Pedroncelli Sauvignon Blanc 2014 ($14, sample, 13.4%): This California white is only going to get better with age, and it’s well done now — aromatic grassiness and some citrus, plus clean, crisp, and a solid finish.

Baron Amarillo Rioja Reserva 2010 ($10, purchased, 13.5%): This Spanish tempranillo — Spain being another important U.S. ally in 1776 — has lots of oak and cherry fruit in some sort of balance, though not as subtle as more expensive reservas. Still, better than most of the world’s $10 wine, and just what you want for a July 4 barbecue.

More Fourth of July wine:
Fourth of July wine 2014
Fourth of July wine 2013
Fourth of July wine 2012
Wine of the week: Josep Masachs Resso 2013

Fourth of July wine 2014

Fourth of July wine 2014Why does the Wine Curmudgeon do a Fourth of July wine post (for seven consecutive years, in fact)? Because the holiday is a birthday party, and what do we do at birthday parties? Drink wine and celebrate, of course.

Consider these bottles for your Fourth of July wine — and don’t forget the porch wine concept, where what you drink has as much to do with how hot it is as anything else:

?Villa des Anges Old Vines Ros 2013 ($9, purchased, 12%): This rose from the south of France, made with cinsault, features barely ripe strawberries and is so fresh that it almost doesn’t taste like wine. Highly recommended, and certain to be in the 2015 $10 Hall of Fame. Yet another example of what a great grape cinsault is for rose.

? Pacific Rim Riesling 2011 ($10, sample, 11.5%): Washington state white is medium dry, with a touch of lime fruit, honey in the middle, and wonderful oiliness. A sophisticated sweet wine, and especially for the price. Chill this, sit on the porch, and you won’t mind too much how hot it is.

? Handcraft Petite Sirah 2011 ($10, sample, 14.5%): Intriguing, inexpensive California red that benefits from the addition syrah and zinfandel — more structure, less over the top fruit. It has petite sirah’s plumminess and spice, but isn’t too heavy (despite the alcohol).

? Gloria Ferrer Private Cuvee NV ($15, purchased, 12.5%): This sparkling wine, without a UPC code, was on sale at Kroger at one-third of what it would have cost in the restaurant where it was supposed to be. How it ended up in a grocery store is a mystery, but if you see it at this price, buy it — firm bubbles, some caramel, and fresh green apple fruit. Failing that, the Ferrer Sonoma Brut, often on sale around this price, is an equally fine value.

More Fourth of July wine:
? Fourth of July wine 2013

? Fourth of July wine 2012
? Wine of the week: Stephen Vincent Cabernet Sauvignon 2011
? My lunch with Provence

Fourth of July wine 2011

A few thoughts about wine and the Fourth of July, which too often isn't seen as much of a wine holiday. But, as the Wine Curmudgeon always points out, every holiday is an occasion for wine. One just needs to find the right label. Look for wines that pair with barbecue and picnic foods like roses, and especially traditional-style zinfandels like the Grgich:

? La Vieille Ferme Rouge 2009 ($8, purchased): This red blend from France has solid, Old World structure, some spice and pepper, tannins and not much fruit. It's still a little rough, but that's not a bad thing.

? Villa San-Juliette Sauvignon Blanc ($15, sample): More California in style than other sauvignon blancs, with grassy aromas and more lemon than grapefruit. Nicely done, especially since it's from Paso Robles, which is hardly thought of as a sauvignon blanc region.

? Grgich Hills Zinfandel 2007 ($35, sample): So beautifully made and complex that it almost doesn't taste like zinfandel. But there's zinfandel's trademark pepper and red fruit (though not quite as brambly as I like). This wine is ready now, but can sit for another year or so, which will help integrate the oak.

For more on Fourth of July wine:
? Fourth of July wine 2010
? Wine of the week: Fattoria dei Barbi Brusco 2008
? Four French wines you can afford
? Wine of the week: Heyman & Hill Cabernet Sauvignon 2007
? Wine of the week: Marietta Old Vine Red Lot Number 53