Tag Archives: crowdfunding

Winebits 424: Scottish wine, domain names, crowdfunding

Scottish wine
A Scottish wine story requires a picture of haggis, the Scottish national dish.

? Too much rain: Scotland’s hopes for its own wine, which never seemed possible because the climate was too cold and too went, have been dashed once again. The drinks business reports that persistent rain in eastern Scotland has prevented Aberdeen’s Christopher Trotter, a chef and food writer, from producing anything commercially viable. He wasn’t able to bottle any wine in 2015, and the 2014 vintage yielded just 10 bottles — which critics called ?undrinkable.” The Wine Curmudgeon feels Trotter’s pain. Regional wine, no matter where the region, is always more difficult than you think it will be, and there are always problems you never imagined. And I’ve tasted plenty of undrinkable regional wine.

? Bring on .wine: Want to brand your website as definitely wine? Then you can buy the .wine and .vin domain names, two so-called not-coms that are finally available. There was concern from some legally protected wine regions, like our friends in Champagne, that the .wine and .vin names would be used to abuse their place names, but they bought Champagne.wine and solved the problem. The Wine Curmudgeon probably won’t buy winecurmudgoen.wine or .vin — not sure it would make much different to my brand, and winecurmudgeon.wine sounds stupid, anyway.

? Kickstarting a winery: Recent changes in federal investment law allow businesses like wineries to use crowdfunding sites like Kickstarter and Indiegogo to raise $1 million in any 12-month period from friends, followers, customers and community as long as the sites meet federal guidelines. This is a significant change to current law, though not everyone is sure it’s a good idea. It’s one thing to raise money for a wine book on Kickstarter; it’s another to raise millions to expand a winery. Regardless of anything else, writes Jesse Debban in the North Bay Business Journal, the new regulations mean “the public — including your competitors and customers — will have access to sensitive information about your business.” Which may be OK in the tech business, but is something completely different in the highly private wine business.

Winebits 401: Randall Grahm crowdfunding, grape diseases, craft wine

crowdfunding ?Crowdfunding success: Randall Grahm, the Bonny Doon impresario, raised $167,857 in his crowdfunding attempt to develop 10,000 new grape varieties, beating the $150,000 goal. Which isn’t quite the same thing as the Wine Curmudgeon being named editor of the Wine Spectator with a mandate to eliminate scores, but is close enough. Most crowdfunding projects fail, and it’s even more difficult for projects that aren’t tech related (as Grahm and I discussed here) to reach their goal. That he did it speaks to the passion surrounding wine and Grahm’s skill at getting out the vote. And then there is this — how can one not appreciate a Salinger allusion?

? The end of Pierce’s Disease? Next to phylloxera, which almost destroyed the French wine industry a century ago, Pierce’s Disease is probably the most dangerous threat to the wine business. It’s spread by insects which inject bacteria into the vine, and the bacteria blocks water from going through the plant, which kills it. There’s no cure or treatment, and the only preventative is pesticide, which brings its own problems. Now, though, Texas researchers may have found a solution, using a combination of viruses injected into the vine to kill the bacteria. Much work still needs to be done, say researchers, but this is among the most promising developments in fighting Pierce’s in decades.

? It’s all about the adjective: Our recent discussion about craft wine brings this, from the Harris survey people, about how consumers react to terms like craft and artisan. The survey found that almost six in 10 think handcrafted or handmade “strongly or somewhat communicates that a product is high quality.” Artisan and artisanal and custom are next at 46 percent, while craft is at 44 percent. The most interesting part? That save for handcrafted, most of us recognize these terms for what they are — marketing jargon with no real meaning.

podcast

Winecast 25: Randall Grahm, Bonny Doon Vineyard

randall grahmRandall Grahm of Boony Doon Vineyards has done plenty of audacious things during his three-decade winemaking career, whether holding a public funeral for the cork or publicly baiting various members of the Winestream Media. But his new project may be the most audacious yet — creating 10,000 new grape varieties from scratch in a California vineyard, and raising the money to do so through crowdfunding. In this, Grahm once again goes where no winemaker has gone before.

In the podcast, we talk about Grahm’s goal to raise $150,000 for the Popelouchum Vineyards in San Juan Batista, Calif., through crowdfunding — “It has been a learning experience, putting it most charitably” — and why terroir matters. In addition, Graham explains how difficult it is to create new grape varieties, involving as it does a jeweler’s loupe, tweezers, and paper bags. There is also more Yiddish than we should have had, insights into the mission and pinotage grapes, and what it takes to convince people to donate money for something that won’t happen for years.

You can contribute to the Popelouchum project here; several of the premiums, starting at $100, allow you to name one of those new grape varieties after anyone you want, including yourself. Crowdfunding ends next week, and it was almost halfway toward its goal when we recorded the podcast on Wednesday.

Click here to download or stream the podcast, which is almost 16 minutes long and takes up 15 megabytes. The sound quality is good, though there is a pause around the six-minute mark when I had to preempt the Wine Curmudgeon’s dogs from barking at the UPS man.