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Nutritional labels for booze

nutritional labelsOnce again, wine falls behind when it comes to nutritional labels

The nutritional label pictured here is for Bulleit Rye, and should be on bottles this summer (click to make it bigger). Is it perfect? No, since it doesn’t list all the ingredients.

But is it still better than almost anything the wine business has done or wants to do? Of course. Because the wine business still doesn’t think consumers want to know this stuff, still thinks it’s not possible to do on a wine bottle, and still thinks consumers act like it’s 1955.

But Diageo, the company that owns Bulleit, knows better. Understand three reasons why this label matters:

• A shot of Bulleit (which is a very nice rye and fairly priced) has 110 calories – about the same as a light beer. Anyone who doesn’t think that matters to consumers hasn’t spent any time in a grocery store watching people read canned soup labels.

• Notice the lines about where the rye was distilled and bottled. This addresses the controversy (and lawsuits) surrounding craft spirits and how they are made. Diageo is practicing transparency, something the wine business is terrified of doing. Call it MegaPurple paranoia.

• “Made using a 95% rye mash,” though confusing if you don’t know spirits, means the Bulleit has almost twice as much rye as required by law. Legally, it can contain as little as 51 percent rye; the rest would be barley, corn, or other grains. The wine equivalent would be listing how much pinot noir is actually in a bottle of pinot noir. Too many producers meet the 75 percent legal requirement, and flesh the wine out with syrah, grenache, petite sirah, or our old friend MegaPurple without telling us what’s in the other 25 percent.

Finally, my contact at Diageo went out of her way to help me with this post, even locating the Bulleit label in proof. I usually don’t get that kind of cooperation from Big Wine when I write about this subject. I don’t wonder why.

More about nutrition and ingredient labels:
Wine and GMO labeling
Update: Nutrition labels and what the wine business doesn’t understand
Nutrition labels coming to wine — finally

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2 thoughts on “Nutritional labels for booze

  • By Kevin - Reply

    I’m fine with nutritional information being published as long as they publish ingredients as well. Otherwise this is all just a push by big beer to make craft beer look bad. Sure, with just nutritional information a Miller Lite looks better than almost any craft beer. But then when a consumer realizes that she/he is drinking mostly corn and adjuncts and not real beer, maybe they’ll understand the difference. Might as well drink a Diet Coke while sitting in some chemical waste facility.

    • By Wine Curmudgeon - Reply

      Yes, we need ingredients as well, which I have been advocating for years. But wine is so far behind everyone else that I’ll settle for something as basic as this. Ironically, many craft beer producers object to the labels because their alcohol levels are so high, and can’t agree on what constitutes a serving size.

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