Category:Wine trends

Tuesday tidbits 19

? Rose sales increase:  Which is good news for those of us who enjoy pink wine. Sales increased about 50 percent in 2007, according to a Nielsen study. Why did this happen? A couple of reasons, I think. Consumers are beginning to understand that rose is not the same as white zinfandel, and offers value for money — especially in the $10 range. Also, producers are making better wine, particularly in California.

? Wine sales in a recession? Tom Wark at the Fermentation wine blog may have found a relationship between wine sales and economic downturns. This is something wine people talk about a lot: How much of a luxury product is wine, and will consumers give it up when times get tough? Wark tracked wine club sales, and there seem to be a cancellations that are following the on-coming recession. “I have no doubt that were it being done for the past 15 years we’d see that at this moment that Index will be in a severe downward trend,” he says.

? Blog awards: And while you’re at Fermentation, take a moment to vote for Alfonso Cevola, whose On the Wine Trail in Italy has been nominated for two American Wine Blog awards. Alfonso not only knows more about Italian wine that almost anyone I know, but he is always incredibly kind and generous with his time. Especially when he is dealing with the Wine Curmudgeon, and we know how difficult that can be.

Texans aren’t all that interested in drinking wine in restaurants

One of the regular themes here is that restaurants do a lousy job of selling wine to their customers. And now the Wine Curmudgeon has hard evidence to go along with his whining.

The new Texas Zagat guide, released yesterday, notes that only about one-third of the state’s diners order a bottle of wine with their meal. Almost half, on the other hand, order wine by the glass.

I suppose one can look at this positively — that 85 percent of Texans who eat in restaurants order wine with their meal. But the Wine Curmudgeon didn’t get where he is by being positive. And, in fact, that’s looking at the numbers through rose’-colored glasses.

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Tuesday tidbits 18

? Why critter wine works: Ever wondered why so many wine labels have so many cute animals on them? So did researchers at Yale, Michigan and the University of Chicago. (Hey, the Wine Curmudgeon runs a class joint.) And they found that consumers are more likely to favor a product that they associate with themselves. Hence, according to the study, we we associate animals (the study tested cats and dogs with several products) with ourselves more than we do with more wine-oriented themes, like a chateau or a grape vine on a label.

? La Bodega wins award: Texas’ La Bodega Winery, best known as the winery in an airport — it’s in terminals A and D at DFW International — was named Best Retail Store Design for the terminal D layout in the Small Retailer Division by the trade journal Airport Revenue News.

? High alcohol wines:  The debate continues, with a leading Sacramento retailer announcing it won’t carry wines with more than 14 1/2 percent alcohol. Regular visitors know how the Wine Curmudgeon feels about high alcohol. It’s interesting to see that others who are less curmudgeonly feel the same way.

Business dinner wine tips

I was at a business dinner the other night, and the group wanted to order wine. What should we get? asked one. I don’t know much about wine. That’s OK, said another. I don’t know much, either. But Siegel does. He can order it.

I mention this not to tout my wine skills (the Wine Curmudgeon is, of course, incredibly modest). Rather, it’s to offer advice for those times when one needs to order wine and there is no wine writer around. This is most often a problem in a business setting, where what one orders is often a reflection of one’s sophistication (as unfair as that may be).

So keep these pointers in mind:

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Another foray against wine scores

image Regular visitors to this space know that the  Wine Curmudgeon feels that wine scores are as much a danger to the Republic as the designated hitter. Each is flashy and showy, and in the end does nothing to make wine or baseball any better.

So when the always knowledgeable W.R. Tish can add his perspective and enthusiasm to the project, I’m happy to share his views. Plus, he is a pretty funny guy, one of the few standup comics/wine writers in the business.

“Ah, where would we be without wine ratings?,” Tish writes. “Probably sitting around a table on a terrace overlooking the Mediterranean with a carafe of ros and the catch of the day ?and not a care in the world as to the wine ?s rating.”

Tish’s effort is here. In this case, the higher the score, the worse the offender. Enjoy, and keep in mind that the only score that matters is whether you like the wine or not.

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