Category:Wine and food pairings

Wine and food pairings 3: Bratwurst and sauerkraut

Wisconsin-style bratwurstThe Wine Curmudgeon pairs wine with some of his favorite recipes in this new, occasional feature. This edition: three wines with Wisconsin-style bratwurst and sauerkraut

There are bratwurst, and then there are local, butcher-shop brats prepared in the Wisconsin bratwurst style. That means brats poached in beer with onions, peppers, garlic, and spices. Yes, you can use grocery store brats, but it’s that much better with the local product. Can I recommend Lake Geneva Country Meats, a long-time pal of the blog?

Since this is a wine blog, I poach the bratwurst in wine instead of beer. Use one-half bottle of a fruity, dry white wine; almost anything but an oak-infused chardonnay will work. The other key? Add a well-drained can of sauerkraut to the poaching liquid after you take the bratwursts out and simmer. I use 69-cent grocery store kraut, which works as well as the more expensive, plastic-bag version. The sauerkraut picks up the flavors from the poaching liquid, and becomes something other than just sauerkraut. Plus, you don’t waste all the flavor in the bratwurst-infused poaching liquid.

A tip o’ the WC’s fedora to Nick Vorpagel at Lake Geneva, the third generation of the family business and a fine wine guy, too. Who else would hold a cava and Wisconsin-style bratwurst tasting? Hence, cava works with this dish, so enjoy the blog’s legendary $7 Cristalino. Click here to download or print a PDF of the recipe.

But consider these wines, too:

Falesco Vitiano Bianco 2017 ($12, purchased, 12%): This Italian white is one of the blog’s all-time favorites, and pairs with sausage as if it was made for it. Imported by The Winebow Group.

Foncalieu Le Versant Rose 2017 ($10, purchased, 12.5%): One more $10 French pink that does everything rose is supposed to do. Plus, it doesn’t cost as much as  bottle of white Burgundy. The Foncalieu is crisp, has a hint of red fruit, and ends with a pleasing, almost stony finish. Imported by United Wine & Spirits

Castello di Gabbiano Chianti 2015 ($8, purchased, 13%): This Italian red is usually one of the best of the cheap Chiantis, though I noticed some bottle variation this vintage. Otherwise, competent as always — lots of tart cherry, earthiness, and soft tannins. Imported by TWE Imports

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Wine and food pairings 2: Roast chicken salad with Chinese noodles
Wine and food pairings 1: Chicken, okra and sausage gumbo
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Wine and food pairings 2: Roast chicken salad with Chinese noodles

roast chicken saladThe Wine Curmudgeon pairs wine with some of his favorite recipes in this new, occasional feature. This edition: three wines with a roast chicken salad with Chinese noodles

Technically, this isn’t chicken salad, not the kind that Americans know all too well – leftover, dried out chicken glopped with too much mayonnaise. Rather, it’s a way to take ingredients as simple as chicken thighs and lettuce and turn it into a dinner more interesting and more fun to eat during the week – yet still easy to do.

This dish has its roots in late 1980s nouvelle cuisine, where the goal was to pile as little food as possible as high on the plate as possible while charging as much money as possible. So, given my sense of humor, why not do the same sort of thing, but that was cheap and enjoyable? In other words, make a simple green salad, top it with the Chinese noodles, and then top the noodles with the roasted chicken thighs. Drizzle with vinaigrette (made from the chicken fat and liquids from roasting, even), and you have one dinner, one plate, and minimal cleanup.

There are two keys here: marinating the chicken thighs in lemon juice, garlic, olive oil, and fresh rosemary; and using the odd Chinese noodles that are dyed yellow. You can substitute rice noodles or even ordinary thin egg noodles, but the Chinese version seems to work the best. Click here to download or print a PDF of the recipe.

Pairing wine with this is not nearly as complicated as it may seem:

GrooVee Grüner Veltliner 2012 ($10, purchased, 12%): Gruner is an Austrian grape that has been touted by the hipsters and the sommeliers as the next big thing for a decade. This is a Hungarian version that turns most Austrian gruners on their heads, despite its age and silly name. Look for a petrol aroma and peach and lime fruit. Imported by Quintessential. Highly recommended.

Zestos Garnacha Old Vines 2015 ($10, purchased, 13%): This Spanish red is a little heavier and more Parker-like this year, but still well worth drinking and neither hot nor too flabby. Lots of red cherry fruit, almost candied, but backed with a peppery finish. Imported by Ole Imports

Arrumaco Rose 2016 ($8, purchased, 11.5%): This Spanish wine is pink. You’re having chicken. What else needs to be said? Look for lots of almost sweet strawberry fruit, though the wine is bone dry. Imported by Handpicked Selections

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Wine and food pairings 1: Chicken, okra and sausage gumbo
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Wine and food pairings 1: Chicken, okra and sausage gumbo

gumboThe Wine Curmudgeon pairs wine with some of his favorite recipes in this new feature. This edition: three wines with a traditional Cajun-style gumbo.

Cajun food has long been considered difficult to pair with wine, since it’s too spicy and many of the ingredients aren’t wine friendly. This, like much Winestream Media advice, is silly and outdated.

This gumbo is based on those I first tasted a long time ago in a galaxy far, far away – when I was the sports editor of the Daily Courier newspaper in Houma, La., about 60 miles southwest of New Orleans. Back then, the only thing I knew about wine was that other people drank it.

Gumbo, like barbecue, is contentious, and there are as many different ways to make it as there are families in south Louisiana. The most bitter debate is about whether tomatoes should be included; most Cajun-influenced recipes don’t use them, and I agree. They make the gumbo too much like tomato soup. On the other hand, John Besh, who knows a thing or two about gumbo, adds tomatoes.

Okra can also be controversial, but I can’t imagine gumbo without it. The rest of the recipe is quite traditional – a roux; the onion, celery, and bell pepper seasoning base; and lots of cooked chicken and smoked sausage. Real andouille is best, but any quality grocery store sausage will do. Click here to download or print a PDF of the recipe.

Pairing wine with this is easier than it seems. The gumbo has an earthy, salty, and slightly spicy flavor, so consider these three styles of wine:

Chateau Bonnet Rose 2016 ($12, purchased, 13%): This French pink from one of the world’s great cheap wine producers has enough fruit for the gumbo’s spice, with sweet cherries and strawberries, as well as an almost limestone minerality. Highly recommended. Imported by Deutsch Family.

Nik. Weis Urban Riesling 2016 ($15, sample, 10%): This German white is more international in style, so it’s a little sweeter with less citrus and without the petrol aroma of more traditional German rieslings. The sweetness, though, makes it spot on with the gumbo. Imported by HB Wine Merchants

Flaco Tempranillo 2015 ($10, purchased, 13.5%): This Spanish red is light enough so it doesn’t overpower the gumbo with big tannins or high alcohol. It has soft cherry fruit and green herb flavors, which fit the dish nicely. Imported by Ole Imports

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