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Wine of the week: Ch teau de Campuget rose 2012

Wine of the week:  Ch teau de Campuget rose 2012The Wine Curmudgeon is putting his keyboard where his metrics are. If rose is really undergoing a resurgence, then this post should be a hit with visitors and not end up in the cyber-ether wasteland where most of my rose reviews go.

And why not? The Campuget ($10, purchased, 13%) is an exceptional rose, especially for the price, made with syrah from the Rhone region of France. Best yet, it’s the kind of wine you can drink all day during Thanksgiving — tasty, fresh, relatively low in alcohol, and something that will pair with almost anything the holiday dishes up (pun sort of intended).

This is a traditional French rose, which means a little cranberry fruit and that the wine is as dry as the proverbial martini. It was exactly what I was hoping for when I bought it. Highly recommended, and a candidate for the 2014 $10 Hall of Fame.

Winebits 309: Thanksgiving 2013

Thanksgiving wine advice from around the cyber-ether, but not including the site that said picking the wrong wines would ruin the Thanksgiving meal. I guess I need to send that person a copy of the cheap wine book.

? The always tasteful Ray Isle at Food & Wine, with two roses — yes, two, and bless you, Ray — and nothing that costs more than $20. My favorite suggestion is the Adami Garb l Prosecco ($15), which he notes is direr than most Proseccos.

? Eric Asimov at the New York Times: “No matter how much you decide to spend on wine, serving myriad sweet and savory foods to a large group is no time to fuss about matching particular bottles with individual flavors; it ?s pointless.” Plus, none of the suggestions costs more than $25, and he says it’s OK if you don’t want to spend that much. Is it any wonder he’s the best wine writer in the U.S.? My favorite suggestion? New York’s Fox Run cabernet franc, made by the very talented Peter Bell.

? How about wines from American winemaking families for this most of American of holidays, suggests Katie Kelley Bell at Forbes? This is not the usual trendy California lineup, either, but includes choices from Virginia and the Pacific Northwest. Her choices are a little pricey, like the Gundlach-Bundschu merlot, but almost all are wines worth drinking.

Expensive wine 56: Torbreck The Steading 2009

steadingOne of the surprises when I wrote this year’s holiday wine trends post was the resurgence in Australian wine. The Aussies have been down for so long, and seemed to have so far to go to come back, that it was one of the last things that I expected.

Yet, on reflection, I’ve seen evidence of that over the past year, on both the low (Yalumba’s $10 wines) and high ends (the d’Arenberg Dead Arm). These are wines that acknowledge the excesses of the past but have found a way to make Australian wine that tastes not like someone thinks it should, but as it should, given the terroir the country’s winemakers have to work with.

The most recent example is The Steading ($38, sample, 15%), a shiraz that mostly lives up to the hype on the winery website: “The Steading is perhaps the most important wine within the Torbreck portfolio. …” It’s powerful, but not offensively so, as was the style in the past when 15 percent shirazes didn’t care what they tasted like as long as they were 15 percent shirazes.

It’s a dark, earthy and peppery wine, and thorougly intriguing. Missing was the blast of black fruit that I expected, but it was still fruity (blackberry?), as a wine of this kind should be. And, though the label says 15 percent alcohol, it didn’t taste like it. This is a a big wine that needs food, and would not be out of place at most holiday tables.

Thanksgiving wine 2013

Thanksgiving wine 2013Thanksgiving could be the greatest wine holiday in the world, if only because there aren’t any rules about what to drink. Or, at least in the enlightened wine drinker’s world, there aren’t any rules. Why should there be? The holiday celebrates the good fortune we enjoy in the second decade of the 21st century, and that we are able to share that good fortune with family and friends. So the wine police are not welcome.

Guidelines for holiday wine buying are here; this year ?s suggestions are after the jump:

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Friday birthday week giveway: The cheap wine book

And the winner is: Jim Caudill, who selected 131; the winning number was 143 (screenshot to the right). Thanks to everyone who participated, and for visiting the blog for the past six years. This was the last of the five daily giveaways.

Today, to celebrate the blog’s sixth anniversary, we’re giving away an autographed copy of the cheap wine book. And have I mentioned lately that it makes a great holiday gift? This is the last of the five daily giveaways

Complete contest rules are here. Briefly, pick a number between 1 and 1,000 and leave it in the comment section of the prize post. One entry to a person, you can’t pick a number someone else has picked, and you need to leave your guess in the comments section of this post. Otherwise, your entry doesn’t count.

If you get the blog via email or RSS, you have to come to the website, winecurmudgeon.com and to this post, to enter. At about 5 p.m. central today, I’ll go to random.org around 5 p.m. central today and generate the winning number. The person whose entry is closest to that number gets the book.

Thursday Birthday Week 2013 giveaway: Wine accessories gift pack

11212013And the winner is: Apsalar, who selected 375; the winning number was 400 (screenshot to the right). Thanks to everyone who participated. Tomorrow’s prize is an autographed copy of the cheap wine book, which makes a great holiday gift. Two makes an even better gift. And three? Stupendous. Friday is the last of the five daily giveaways.

Today, to celebrate the blog’s sixth anniversary, we’re giving away a wine accessories gift pack, including a wine tote, corkscrew, and white wine ice bag, courtesy of Nomacorc. This is the fourth of five daily giveaways; check out this post to see the prizes for the rest of the week.

Complete contest rules are here. Briefly, pick a number between 1 and 1,000 and leave it in the comment section of the prize post. You can’t pick a number someone else has picked, and you need to leave your guess in the comments section of this post. Otherwise, your entry doesn’t count.

If you get the blog via email or RSS, you have to come to the website, winecurmudgeon.com and to this post, to enter. At about 5 p.m. central today, I’ll go to random.org and generate the winning number. The person whose entry is closest to that number gets the gift pack.